About Sharon Guynup

 

Sharon’s work as a journalist, photographer and producer has taken her to the remote heart of Eastern Siberia’s haven for grizzly bears, Assam’s last haven for Indian rhinos, Kaziranga National Park, and Turkey’s Eastern Anatolian villages; by boat to the river towns and temples along Myanmar’s Irrawaddy River, and cross country across Cuba, with plenty of time in Caribbean nations and Latin American jungles.

Her new book is a collaboration with award-winning National Geographic photographer Steve Winter. Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Big Cat, published by National Geographic Books, melds spectacular images of tigers and their secret behaviors with insights into why one of the world’s most iconic species is careening towards the edge--and describes the extraordinary efforts to save them.

Weaving storytelling with cultural, historical, scientific and medical information, Sharon crafts features, essays and editorials for national and international publications. Areas of special interest include natural history, wildlife conservation, climate change and other environmental issues, rainforest and ocean ecology, environmental and women’s health, genetics, earth sciences, indigenous peoples, nanotechnology, zoonotic disease, world religions, and adventure travel.

She has contributed articles and commentary to Smithsonian, Huffington Post, Scientific American, The Boston Globe, Scientific American Mind, BBC Wildlife,  The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Popular Science, nationalgeographic.com, and Audubon, among other publications. She served as contributing writer for Genome News Network and her  news and commentary has been syndicated by The New York Times Syndicate, Blue Ridge Press. She has blogged on scientific research for Stevens Institute of Technology and on forest issues for the Center for International Forestry Research.

She currently blogs for National Geographic Cat Watch.

Over the last two years, Sharon has been producing short documentary videos.

Sharon has edited special issues for Scientific American, including "The Hidden Mind," which stands among SA’s bestselling issues and was part of the editorial advisory board for the launch of Scientific American’s Lives: New Answers for Global Health.

She also writes science stories for kids for such publications as Science World, National Geographic Explorer, Current Science and Current Health.

As a documentary photographer, Sharon’s work has earned her a Fulbright Fellowship to Turkey, a New Jersey State Council on the Arts Fellowship and a Lowell Thomas Award for travel photography. Her work has been widely exhibited, and has worked on assignment for many U.S. and international publications.

Sharon served as adjunct assistant professor and internship director at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute in the graduate Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program from 2007-2011. She also volunteers in the Society of Environmental Journalists’ Mentoring Program.

As an expert on international tours to Costa Rica, Panama, India, Vietnam and Cambodia, Sharon has lectured for The American Museum of Natural History and National Geographic Expeditions.

She is a member of The Society of Environmental Journalists, The National Association of Science Writers, and The Explorer’s Club and sits on the affiliate council of the International League of Conservation Photographers.

Sharon lives in Hoboken, New Jersey.


 

Click here to view Sharon’s resume.

      India’s Zanskar Valley, 2006

© Will White

Satellite collaring a jaguar, Brazilian Pantanal, 2010

Zanskar Valley, India, 2006

Sharon is currently a Public Policy Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., where she is working on a new book project.


Her work as an award-winning journalist, author, photographer and multimedia storyteller has taken her to the remote heart of Eastern Siberia; to Kaziranga National Park, Assam’s last haven for Indian rhinos; to Thailand to investigate illegal wildlife trade at the infamous Tiger Temple; by boat to the river towns along Myanmar’s Irrawaddy River; through Cuba, across the American West with storm chasers tracking tornadoes--and extensive reporting from Latin American and South Asian jungles.


Sharon’s most recent book, Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Big Cat, is a collaboration with award-winning National Geographic photographer Steve Winter that was published by National Geographic Books. It melds powerful images of tigers and their secret behaviors with insights into why one of the world’s most iconic species is careening towards extinction--and describes the extraordinary efforts to save them.

Weaving storytelling with scientific, historical, health, environmental and cultural information, Sharon crafts features, essays and editorials for national and international publications, often producing both text and photo packages. Areas of expertise include biodiversity, wildlife conservation and illegal wildlife trade; energy and  climate change; rainforest and ocean ecology, environment and pollution; global and women’s health; science and technology; and zoonotic disease.

Sharon has contributed articles and commentary to National Geographic, The New York Times, Smithsonian, Huffington Post, Scientific American, TakePart, Mongabay, The Boston Globe, BBC Wildlife, Scientific American Mind, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Popular Science, and other publications. She served as contributing writer for Genome News Network and her news and commentary have been syndicated by The New York Times Syndicate. She has blogged on tigers for National Geographic Cat Watch, on scientific research for Stevens Institute of Technology and on forest issues for the Center for International Forestry Research.

She also produces short documentary videos.

Sharon edits special issues for Scientific American, including "The Hidden Mind," which stands among SA’s bestselling issues, and was part of the editorial advisory board for Scientific American’s Lives: New Answers for Global Health.

In 2006, she launched State of the Wild: A Global Portrait of Wildlife, Wildlands and Oceans, a book series produced by The Wildlife Conservation Society, published by Island Press. Contributors included George Schaller, Rick Bass, Carl Safina, Bill McKibben and other prominent scientists and writers.

As a documentary photographer, Sharon has worked on assignment for many U.S. and international publications. She’s been awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to Turkey, a New Jersey State Council on the Arts Fellowship and a Lowell Thomas Award for travel photography. Her images have been widely exhibited.

Sharon served as adjunct assistant professor and internship director at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute in the graduate Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program from 2007-2011. She has volunteered in the Society of Environmental Journalists’ Mentoring Program for more than a decade.

As an expert on international tours to Costa Rica, Panama, India, Vietnam and Cambodia, Sharon has lectured for The American Museum of Natural History and National Geographic Expeditions.

She is a member of The Society of Environmental Journalists, The National Association of Science Writers, The Society of Professional Journalists, Investigative Reporters and Editors, and The Explorer’s Club.

Sharon has received fellowship support from the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources and the National Association of Science Writers. She lives in Hoboken, New Jersey and Washington, D.C.

© Will White

Click here to view Sharon’s resume.

Tiger Temple, Thailand, 2015